Google and Apple winning the Internet of Things.

There are many companies in the space we broadly refer to as "The Internet of Things" (IoT). But the IoT is fragmented and there is little interoperability between platforms. Getting developers to dedicate time to a specific platform is very important, so who is winning over developers in the IoT race? Apparently Apple and Google, according to Matt Asay writing for Read Write

As I've written, to flourish the Internet of Things market needs millions of developers by 2020. Fortunately, the market is actively minting new developers each day, with the global Internet of Things developer population set to top 4.5 million by 2020:

Image courtesy of Vision Mobile.

Image courtesy of Vision Mobile.

Asay notes that many of these IoT developers are from the Asia-Pacific region, but these developers still identify as "mobile developers." Google and Apple will soon change that. 

As VisionMobile Q1 2015 Developer Economics survey data reveals, 53% of mobile developers are already actively working on Internet of Things projects. The top two markets within the field are smart homes (37% of relevant developers are working in this area) and wearables (35%).

The number of developers getting paid to work on IoT projects also matters. Most IoT developers work on hobby projects (30%) or side projects (20%). These developers are more likely to become full-time IoT developers if they can work on platforms that don't require them to learn an abundance of new skills. 

In the IoT space, Apple now has many platforms including HomeKit and Apple Watch. Google has Nest and Android Wear. Both companies offer platforms that are similar to their existing mobile platforms. So, the company with the most IoT developers is at an advantage, and right now that's Apple and Google. 

Android, the future home of open source

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Matt Asay, of Read Write, predicts Android will be the preferred home for open source developers in the future. According to data from Black Duck software, "new Android-related mobile open-source projects outstripped open source iOS projects by a factor of four in 2012, growing by more than 96% each year since 2007. New iOS project growth, on the other hand, was just 32% from 2011 to 2012."

Developers have historically favoured Apple's iOS due to its superior developer tools and monetization. This shift toward Android should be concerning to Apple, as it might suggest open-source developers are beginning to view Android as a better platform for launching new innovative apps.

Check out Matt Asay's article below.